PB4Y-2_Privateer_VP-23_in_flight
Match 1
Consolidated_PB4Y-2_Naval_Aviation_Museu
Match 2 (port view)_edited

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Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer
VPB-106, Palawan, Phillipines
May 1945

This model is under construction. I will update the page as the build progresses.

 

See below for some photos of what has been done so far  

Construction photos 

1. crew
1. crew

The 1/72 crew member figures in the Matchbox PB4Y-2 privateer

2. view ports added
2. view ports added

The half-fuselage of Matchbox's PB4Y-2 Privateer, following inserting the view ports and scribing panel lines.

9. first layer of white +lines
9. first layer of white +lines

After a first layer of insignia white, some pre-shading (or middle shading?) with Tamiya Weathering Master.

1. crew
1. crew

The 1/72 crew member figures in the Matchbox PB4Y-2 privateer

1/9

1. Step 1: Meet the crew.

2. After several days of work, the windows are added, and made flush with the fuselage. This was a really fiddly job. Given the amount of sanding needed, I decided to be proactive and scribe recessed panel lines.

3. A lot of time is needed to build the turrets. Joining the pieces to make the nose turret (Erco Ball turret) and the tail turret (Consolidated MPC250CH-6) would be easy if you had 3 hands, but for me this required a lot of attempts involving dropping pieces on the floor. For the engines, I decided to ignore the instructions and not use the mysterious plastic rings (parts 61). These do not seem to correspond to any part of the real Twin Wasp R-1830-94 engines, and, if used, completely obscure the cylinder mounts.

4. Cockpit assembled. This is what you get out of the box. I could have spiced it up but it soon became clear that this will be barely visible after the canopy is added. Sorry about that.

5. Prior to joining the fuselage; the side blisters (aka Erco Tear drop turrets) are glued in and joined, requiring a lot of fine filling and sanding to avoid gaps). This image shows how much weight I put in the front. I hope this will be enough... 

6. Fuselage halves joined, nose section added. By that stage I have already had a go at painting the fuselage (Alclad black base, followed by the mixed acrylics I explain above) to test whether the colour would look good. But then, a lot of sanding was required to make the joint between nose and main sections of the fuselage, and between the fuselage halves, smooth. At this stage, the vertical and horizontal stabilisers had also been added, and joints filled with Vallejo putty.

7. Both wings glued, sanded, and scribed. Not shown here, the wheel wells (masked here in preparation for painting) were painted interior (zinc chromate) green before the half-wings were joined. At this stage, the engine nacelles are just dry-fitted.

8. Finally taking shape. Clear parts masked in preparation for painting. Note the amount of white putty needed following joining the engine nacelles to the wings.

9. After an initial layer of insignia white (SMS), I applied some shading using Tamiya Weathering Master (oil stain, burnt blue and rust in different places). It looks pretty bad at the moment, but the effect will becomes subtler as additional fine layers of white lacquer are applied on top.  

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